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, britain's crucial wall it need civil war." good to have you on this program. let me start by asking you what there is to value or appreciate about the british role? why should we care about the british rule, what they thought about the civil war? >> it is very hard to even believe that, once upon a time, britain was the most powerful country on the planet. in the 1860's, it mattered. which side britain chose would determine the course of the war. at the beginning, britain went neutral credit that allowed the role of the south to do get out. they spend the rest of the war .rying to change britain's mind more than that, the southern coast was located by federal ships. the only way it would get its arms and medicines and volunteers from of is if they wanted over. they equated those block gators and give themselves a lifeline for almost two years -- they either aided -- they eveaded those blockaders and gave themselves a wi-fi from most years. was hours away neutral on a war that was over the instrument of black people. when they did get involved, they took the side of the south. how my sup
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
, news international closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitabl
, notorious, "news of the world." known in britain as "news of the screws." it is the first time in a scandal that i have seen this inanimate object, this paper, punished. the people have not yet been punished, but the paper has, and the journalists are also the factor being punished. you can see immediately that this is not "the new york times ." it is flashy, full of enormously creative topography, and full of short-clad females. this is not the kind of thing that you see in "the washington post." when i was in newspapers, we used to do these mock issues. what if they had gone out and hit the loading dock? >> today, with the internet, that can happen. >> what were people looking for when they picked up this newspaper? >> much more of what we do in delivered a culture, it is a sort of envy, living vicariously. if i was only living in that said, went to those parties, dressed like that. "news of the world" started covering court cases. they did it in a very traditional, matter of fact way. the headlines were quite famous in their own right. you would pick this up knowing that you were getting
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comfort to them to say, "yes,
"atlantis," the final launch of the nasa shuttle program. >> brown: britain's "news of the world" scandal expands, and ray suarez explores its impact on both journalism and politics. >> lehrer: tom bearden has the latest on the exxon pipeline rupture that gushed thousands of gallons of crude oil into a montana river. >> it's been a week since the silver tip pipeline released oil into the yellowstone river. but it may be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william a
for joining us. now to the hacking scandal which continues in britain. but those even further. after gordon brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his you
. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring alarm bells. >> they have been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead, and we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning to put things away, because we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken control in areas controlled or influenced militant islamists. now they say a ban has been lifted, but politics are complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. so the familiar images of hunger and the predictable scramble for money and resources. >> for more on efforts to assist those suffering from drought, i am joined by the deputy assistant secretary for refugees and migration. you have just returned from the refugee camps of eastern africa. tell us what you saw. >> i have been too many refugee camps across the world. i can tell you is among the worst i have ever seen. the rate coming into the camps is very high. it is 1300 a day into
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent a long time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an extraordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >>
the debt ceiling on his own pending some final, long-term agreement. >> ifill: now, britain's prime minister takes on his critics in the phone hacking scandal. david cameron faced questions today about hiring a former tabloid editor who's since resigned and been arrested and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the phone hacking scandal in britain came full comes full circle today, with word that the "news of the world" tabloid will cease to publish after 168 years in business. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the news electrified britain-- sunday's edition of "news of the world"-- the most widely read english language newspaper in the world-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with le
>> welcome to our program. we begin with the prime minister of great britain, david cameron, answering questions in the house of commons. we have an assessment from lionel barber, the editor of the "financial times," and london bureau chief, catherine mayer. >> it came up in yesterday's hearing, and it's willful blindness. that is to say those people who should have known but didn't ask the right questions, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "th
pulled on britain's most scandalous newspaper, hacking continues. >> america will continue the dream with the space shuttle liftoff. >> the u.s. space program reaches the end of an era with hundreds of thousands watching on. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. just an hour ago, the world welcomed a new nation when the republic of south sudan officially regained -- officially gained its independence. it comes after a brutal civil war and a peace deal with the south and north. celebrations are already under way, but there are huge challenges, including continued violence along the border. >> the final march 2 independence. i will never leave my land until i die, the song heard throughout the decades of war with north sudan. and now they have their land and south sudan is born. ♪ [singing] ♪ >> with a little help the reverse of the brand new national anthem. -- they rehearse the brand new national anthem. because of the war, south sudan will start out as one of the poorest nations on the planet. >> when we were ruled by the north we had no opportuni
industry. bbc news. >> while the pressure continues to build in britain, as you have seen here in the united states, there are growing calls for investigations into the activities of news corporation. joining me is our washington correspondent. thank you for coming in. who is calling for this investigation, and what would be the focus? >> their two separate areas. it comes from congress, where interest has picked up suddenly. the first and most sensitive area is on the issue of whether or not there was an attempt by a news of the world reporter to hack into or obtain the information that might lead to the ability to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. and various senators and one member of the house, who runs the moment security committee, have called for investigations. he has written to the fbi, calling for an investigation. the second issue which is separate is whether or not the payments through allegedly made in britain by members of the "news of the world," employees of new corp., whether those payments actually breach the foreign corrupt practices act. america tak
the murdoch news empire is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everythin
the british. did both turkey and greece have their eyes on cyprus as a prize? >> greece, turkey and britain became what is the tree obligation of the republic of cyprus. this is a treaty of guarantee. the republic was in alliance with greece and turkey through a formal treaty of alliance that permitted both to have armed forces from the island. the british already secured a their interests by obtaining the sovereign base areas at the time of independence. other countries had a historical connection will with cyprus. because 82% was greek, that -- turkey embarked on the shape of the ottoman empire and was here for 300 years. of course, they had a 18% of the population identifying themselves as turkish cypriots. >> hall or the turkish cypriots and greek cypriots getting along? >> the greek cypriots and turkish cypriots got on very well. >> what happens in 1974? >> the major event was the turkish invasion of cyprus in july and august. there were two invasions'. one in july and one in august. this had an enormous effect the turkish army invaded from the northern coast, expelled all of the greek
at home. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: britain today added itself to a list of more than 30 countries, including the united states, now giving diplomatic recognition to the rebels' national transitional council. british foreign secretary william hague: >> the national transitional council has shown its commitment to a more open and democratic libya, something that it is working to achieve through an inclusive political process. this is in stark contrast to qaddafi whose brutality against the libyan people has stripped him of all legitimacy. >> suarez: hague also said the move paves the way for the rebels to get access to $150 million of libyan oil money held in britain. and he announced the expulsion of the few remaining envoys from colonel qaddafi's regime within three days, but they could reportedly be given more time if they choose to defect. qaddafi, meanwhile, continues to reject calls to step down and in a further act of defiance, libyan state television yesterday showed the lockerbie bomber abdelbaset al megrahi at a pro-government rally. his appearance comes nearly t
as early as 2009. britain has joined france in suggesting that colonel qaddafi should remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. william hague said that although britain's preference was for colonel qaddafi to go into exile, it was up to the libyan people to decide. now, to the u.s. debt talks which are locked in a bitter standoff. with just a little more than a week to go until the august 2 deadline when the u.s. must lift the debt ceiling or risk default, both sides are digging in for a fight. today, rival proposals were rolled out and tonight, the president will address the nation in a televised address. but among those who think the tea party republicans should hold their ground is freshman representative joe walsh and he joins me now from capitol hill. thank you very much for joining us. are you really prepared to risk the country going into default over this? >> no. no one wants to risk default. nobody up here in this town wants to do that, jane. we just want to make sure we get this right, that we get the solution right. we met with a couple of the credit agencies last w
; britain's tabloid scandal; the stakes in risking a government default; the hunt for ladybugs; and memories of first lady betty ford. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street struggled again today as debt worried in europe weighed on investors. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 59 points to close below 12,447. the nasdaq fell more than 20 points to close under 2782. european leaders and markets also faced a gathering storm of worries over italy and its financial condition. in a bid to restore calm, prime minister silvio berlusconi vowed to accelerate adoption of austerity measures to balance his country's budget. we have a report narrated by faisal islam of independent television news. >> the europe's announcement of the meeting in brussels with the financial market slump and ratchet up the cost of borrowing yet another highly indebted mediterranean country, except this time it's for real not a tiny peripheral economy but italy the world's eighth biggest economy. in rome no sense of a greek-style crises just yet. however this city
in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the phones of celebrities, royals, slain soldiers, and murder victims. at the outset, he and son james, the current c.e.o. of news corporation, set a tone of contrition. >> these actions don't live up to the standards our company aspires to everywhere around the world. and it is our determination to put things right, make sure this doesn't happen again, and to be the company that i know we've always aspired to be. as for my comments, mr. chairman, and my statement, which i believe was around the closure of "the news of the world newspaper" >> brown: the long-simmering scandal at murdoch's "news of the world" exploded two weeks ago with re
, of course, but today, britain's saluted ronald reagan. the foreign secretary brought a message from lady thatcher, who had hoped to attend but was not well enough to attend. >> ronald reagan was a great president and a great man, a true leader for our kind. he held clear principles and acted upon them with purpose. >> and ronald reagan's legacy was hailed by condoleezza rice as an example for today, particularly in the middle east. >> it gives us hope and optimism to continue to stand for those who are still trapped in tyranny. >> the reputation of some political leaders fades with time, but for ronald reagan, it seems to be the reverse. critics often regarded him as a second bit actor who had no business trying to play a part on the world stage. those critics are much less vocal now, and ronald reagan has certainly found a place in the sun. bbc news, grosvenor square. >> ronald reagan being honored in london, and before we go, cartop story, hugo chavez has returned to venezuela after being treated for cancer in cuba. he is now addressing a crowd outside the presidential palace in caraca
a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to represent the team at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get any easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four while she was living in kenya. she was born in the u.k. and in 2007 decided to return here. she boarded at plymouth college where she befriended a diving gold medalist. she has now moved in with her got parents to set up for the olympics. while most teenagers find it difficult to drag themselves out of bed, she has been here since the crack of dawn. she's incredibly committed to his swimming but she is also very focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee with her friend, it is off to school where she is studying for a levels. double economics is followed by double politics in which she is contemplating a career beyond the swimming pool. she has her work perfect and france to catch up with before squeezing in a driving lesson, all before the end of school. what sometim
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the scandal is spreading. from britain's royal family to its former prime minister, the allegations of hacking by rupert murdoch's media empire could have a global impact. east africa's drought is labeled the world's worst, but with so many in need, why is one refugee camp in kenya completely empty? and it is a question of identity. for native americans, the system has long helped define their tribes, but times have changed. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. another day and yet more extraordinary revations in the hacking scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire. first came a story that the news of the world reporters tried to buy top-secret information about the royal family from one of its protection officers. in a separate case, another murdoch paper is alleged to have targeted personal liberation of the former prime minister when he was chancellor. >> the head of state, the royal family, her and their security is the duty of the police in the royal protection branch. the integr
on pbs and around the globe. each day brings a new twist in the scandal that has engulfed britain. today was no exception. first the news of the second high-profile resignations and scotland yard in 24 hours when john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former "news of the world" reporter that alleged widespread hacking was found dead. the circumstances are not believed to be suspicious. nick robinson reports. >> he resigned just a day after his boss, commissioner paul stephenson. both are paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal, so says the mayor of london. >> i have just come off of the phone with yates and tendered his resignation. >> insisted both men jumped and were not pushed. he made it clear he did everything to encourage them. >> there are issues and questions. it will make it difficult for them to continue to do their job in the way they wanted. >> john yates began the day determined not to resign. he told colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he explained why he was going. >> we are truly accountable. those of us to take on th
and fitter and not to be missed -- bitter and not to be missed. >> pressure continues to mount in britain. in the u.s., the fbi is closing allegations that news corp. tried to hack into the phone records of victims of the 9/11 attack. more on that border of the story -- part of the story. news corp. is headquartered in new york. the fbi seems to be bowing to pressure from politicians. >> that is right. what happened last night, a republican congressman from long island called on the fbi to open an investigation and two reports there was an attempt to obtain the phone records and numbers of the 9/11 victims, especially british victims and this attempt was made by "news of the world" reporters. this is the allegation. made in a rival newspaper. this is what it politicians want to have investigated. 9/11 is a totemic issue as we approach the 10th anniversary. people cannot believe this could be -- possibly have happened. i understand the investigation is in its preliminary stages. it does not mean a thing has done wrong but murdoch was a company is facing investigations on both sides of the
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
earlier point perhaps the end game is to get full control of b. sky b. in britain for the satellite broadcasting, a $19 billion deal, if it is able to get clarify for that deal, what does it mean for news corp. shareholders? >> that would potentially be a nice boost. i think that it is certainly something that any media investor knows right now is something that's very important from the vantage point of news corp.. news corp., like many other media companies, including the parent of time warner, is a challenging environment right now from an advertiser's standpoint, eve 2010 the economy slowly picking up. and the beauty of the satellite is that you get all of these fees that come in addition to ad revenue, that's why it's such a lucrative business, not just in the u. k. but around the world. >> tom: paul, we appreciate the insight, thanks for sharing it with us. paul la monica, author of "inside rupert's brain. " >> susie: here in the u.s., a federal appeals court today reinstated a ban on media companies owning both a newspaper and a television station in the same market. the ban
orthodox community. several of his extended family members live in france and britain. he's a chemistry major who wants to study medicine, and he's planning to do so abroad. >> i would like to stay here, but i see that the peace -- the peace process that they are moving in will not achieve itself within the coming few years or within the coming 200 years. so why to suffer and struggle? living under the occupation is not a normal life. it's a stressed life and we have to get out of this. >> reporter: bethlehem university was founded in 1973, and today about 30% of the students are christians, 70% muslim. university administrators are aware of the challenge they face. >> the difficulty with education is once you've educated someone they become mobile, and so they have opportunities elsewhere. our goal is to try and encourage people to stay in the holy land. that's why we're here to start with. >> reporter: leaders of the holy land's historic churches have been trying to encourage their flock to stay. for example, while the anglican church provides social services for all people, it's also
company british sky broadcasting. the deal has come under a full- scale inquiry by britain's competition commission. separately, newscorp today withdrew its offer to spin off sky news if the b. sky b. deal is approved. >> susie: while washington is focused on the debt debate, tonight's commentator wants to have a bigger conversation about growth. he's glenn hubbard, dean of the graduate school of business at columbia and former top economic advisor to president george w. bush. >> our current national debate over fiscal austerity masks a conversation we need to have about growth-- to raise incomes and create jobs. faster growth doesn't just happen. a supportive policy environment is needed. we need to encourage participation in the workforce and to provide education and training that match the skills required for today and tomorrow. the productivity of our workforce also depends on the plant and equipment and software businesses have. we need tax reform to promote that investment. growth is powerful. at a 3% growth rate that we can achieve over time, average incomes will double between a
to be rdered mile dowler. in is exploded in the public mind in britain and has spread around the world affecting even u.s. investors perceptions of the wider pire which goes so much widethan these british newspapers. through that period, rupert murdoch and his son james seemed absolutely determined to stand by rebecca brooks, there are very few people in this company who are cler to rupert and the whole family to his children as well than rebecca brooks, she was a very integral memberf this sort of london court that had formed around james and his sister elizabeth and which had included david cameron and other members of the british political media establishment. only a week or so ago rupert murdoch said he had total confidence in rebecca brooks. the first thing he did when he flew into london to try and sort this crisis out was stage a photo opportunity with his arm around rebecca, asked what his first priority was on landing in london. he pointed to her and said this one. >> rose: so why did she resign? >> i think because the attempts to take the pressure off so far had failed. the c
have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times" accessed his bank account and he believes his son's medical records were obtained by the "sun" newspaper. >> that they had information that fraser had cystic fibrosis which was a matter that they the family were just getting their heads around at the time and dealing with. >> reporter: it was a fast moving day of
on britain to make. >> yes. >> to live with. >> yes. >> is full fuing science. >> yeah,. >> what is it about david cameron that made him a believer. okay, so he had a science minister david willits who was very pro this. but also a number of us including myself, actually, had a lot of discussion at different levels of government including with david cameron and persuaded him that science and knowledge is the basisof innovation and innovation is the basis of economic growth. >> and that, if you switch off the knowledge machine you ll swih of ultimate growth. and they bought into that as they should have done. >> that's part of what the president emphasized in his state of the union speech. >> he did. i think -- >> what's the difrence in cameron and obama? >> wel, i think i think we-- i think the problem here is you have toave a long-term view. so the oma smulation money though very welcome was for a two year period. and it's not like building roads and keeping people in the employment. science is actually best seens a long-term invement. and rlly. >> but the key is investment rather than expe
also caused a stir in britain in recent years with a highly unflattering portrait of queen elizabeth the second lucian freud was 88 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn again to indonesia, where a spike in food prices is now adding to the problems of poverty and hunger. ray suarez has the final installment of his series from the southeast asian nation. >> reporter: travel across indonesia's most populous island, java, and it's hard to imagine going hungry here. the intensely cultivated fields are bursting with green-- rice, potatoes, bananas, tea. but head to one of the many slums in jakarta, and it gets easier to understand how vulnerable poor people can be. >> ( translated ): food prices have been going up sharply. rice, eggs, oil. it's all going up. >> reporter: back in 2008 when food prices soared worldwide, people in the developing world who had been moving ahead economically were pushed back into poverty, and hunger. josette sheeran heads the united nation's world food program. >> we saw the number increase by 140 millio
. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the phone- hacking scandal in britain threatened to spread to the u.s. today. it was widely reported that the f.b.i. is investigating whether a rupert murdoch tabloid in london tried to access voicemails of 9/11 victims. and murdoch defended his handling of the scandal, speaking to "the wall street journal," which he also owns. he said he's just getting annoyed at all the criticism of his company. a federal judge in washington has declared a mistrial just two days into the perjury trial of baseball great roger clemens. the judge acted after prosecutors showed the jury some evidence that had already been disallowed. clemens is accused of lying to congress when he said he never used steroids. he had nothing to say as he left the courthouse. the judge set a september hearing to decide on holding a new trial. a suicide bomber in afghanistan killed five people today at a memorial service for ahmed wali karzai-- half-brother of the afghan president. the bomber blew himself up at ae kandahar mosque where the service was under way. president karzai w
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